The use of a horseshoe kidney in renal transplant remains controversial, when it is found in the evaluation of a living donor, anatomical, surgical and ethical issues are involved.

A 51 year old woman was considered as a kidney donor to her 30 year-old son. Recipient was transplanted 11 years before with his father’s right kidney and implanted in the left side of the lower abdomen. After 10 years of adequate renal function, he developed chronic rejection and returned to hemodialysis. A new transplant was proposed and the mother was found to be the only available donor. Mother’s preoperative study protocol was uneventful, except for the finding in the renal artery resonance of a horseshoe kidney with fused lower poles and no major vascular or urological abnormalities. The case was presented to the hospital transplant committee and surgery was authorized.

Donor and recipient were reevaluated at 24 months and both remain in good health and no complications.

Excised kidney was perfused with a histidine-tryptophan solution (Custodiol HTK)

Donor and recipient were reevaluated at 24 months and both remain in good health and no complications. Read more